24. 09. 2018
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Edmonton Catholic schools short modular classrooms – Edmonton

Edmonton Catholic schools short modular classrooms – Edmonton

Watch above: Rising enrolment numbers and limited space at Edmonton schools are plenty to contend with, but now some elementary schools are facing an additional shortage of space. Shallima Maharaj explains.

EDMONTON – Some students in Edmonton will be heading back to school to temporary classrooms.

The Edmonton Catholic School District says it’s waiting on 16 modulars and they won’t be delivered until mid-October at the earliest.

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Related

  • Edmonton Catholic students help build portables for crowded school

  • Edmonton public to announce plan to deal with overcrowding

Lori Nagy, manager of media relations with Edmonton Catholic Schools, says 11 schools will be impacted. Nagy was not able to provide the names of the schools, just that they are all elementary schools.

While the situation is creating some challenges, Nagy says Edmonton Catholic Schools has a plan in place.

“Every child will have a desk, will have a place to sit. We will have to use spaces that aren’t typically educational spaces,” she said Wednesday. “For instance, perhaps a staff room or a library or a music room, but we still can accommodate all of the students.”

Alberta Infrastructure says the reason for the delay is because it’s using a new manufacturer.

“We’ve been working with them, but some extra time was needed to ensure that the prototypes that they were building for us met the educational standards,” said Sharon Lopatka, director of communications with Alberta Infrastructure.

Meanwhile, the Edmonton Public School Board has ordered 18 portables, 12 of which are ready for transport and the remaining six are expected to arrive by early September.

Transportation of all 18 will happen in September, and installation is expected to take two months, so they won’t be ready for students until December.

However, Ayesha Moughel, a spokesperson for Edmonton Public, says the portables aren’t required this September to address spacing issues, so the time frame won’t present a problem.

In February, Edmonton Public shrunk its attendance boundaries to handle student population growth.

Since 2005, 46 new neighbourhoods have been served by Edmonton Public. More than 11,000 of the students who attend public schools live in those newer areas.

READ MORE: Edmonton Public Schools facing influx of younger students

Over the past two years, a number of local schools ordered portables to help ease spacing challenges due to increased enrollment.

In September 2013, some schools, including Donald Massey, combined several classes into one to save space. Esther Starkman and Johnny Bright schools used the gym or library as classrooms until more portables arrived.

With files from Shallima Maharaj, Global News.

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24. 09. 2018
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‘Snake whisperer’ shares his love for serpents – Lethbridge

‘Snake whisperer’ shares his love for serpents – Lethbridge

To many people snakes are slithering reptiles that are always avoided. But Ryan Heavy Head isn’t most people.

“I’ve always been naturally attracted to them for some reason.” When he was just 8-years-old, Heavy Head spotted a boa constrictor in a pet store.“They were $50 dollars and my mom told me if I could raise $25 dollars she’d go halves with me. Not expecting an eight-year-old to be able to raise $25 dollars.”

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But sure enough Heavy Head raised the money and bought the boa constrictor. A moment that started his lifelong relationship with serpents. Years later, Heavy Head is still involved with snakes and leads the Lethbridge Rattlesnake Conservation Program. It’s one of the only programs of its kind in Canada. Citizens around the city who spot a rattlesnake can call the rattlesnake hotline. From there they’ll be directed to Heavy Head who picks up the snake and relocates it to a safe area. “If there’s not some kind of a process somewhere that people can call, an avenue that they can have the snakes removed, then the snakes are in danger.”

Heavy Head also posts videos of him relocating the snakes on the organizations Facebook page. He hopes these efforts help erase the negative stigma that surrounds them. “I’m very interested in helping educate the lethbridge public about the rattle snakes and hopefully getting them more excited about co-existing with them, rather than in fear of them.”Heavy Head plans to take the Lethbridge Rattlesnake Conservation Program’s message to school’s around Lethbridge.

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24. 09. 2018
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Frosh week is on its way – Montreal

Frosh week is on its way – Montreal

MONTREAL – Frosh week is upon us once again.

It’s a rite of way in Canada; four days of orientation before university classes begin.

In Montreal – and at McGill specifically – Frosh week typically involves a lot of drinking and a lot of partying.

Yet, McGill freshmen insist it’s about more than that.

“I think it’s about meeting people,” said Marielle Montenegro, a freshman.

“I think the drinking is just a bonus,” said Charles Keita, another freshamn.

Story continues below HangZhou Night Net

“I think the main part is it’s just a big icebreaker.”

Frosh organizers agree.

“Drinking does happen for those who choose to drink but it is not the focus of Frosh,” said Mitchell Miller, who works for McGill’s office of Campus Life and Engagement.

Organizers say they’re making it a point to warn students about the risks of alcohol because for many, freshman year in Montreal will be the first time they consume large quantities of alcohol.

Organizers also say they’re trying to make the event more inclusive, so that even those who choose not to drink can enjoy it.

“I came to Montreal not knowing anyone or anything,” recalls Frosh coordinator Shanon Melizan.

“It was definitely that stepping stone that I needed to fit it. I don’t consumer alcohol and I had an amazing time.”

Police say they do receive more complaints from local residents during Frosh week than other times of the year.

Doctors at the Montreal General say they’ve noticed an increase in the number of alcohol-related cases admitted to the ER.

“We see minor to moderate to very severe, unfortunately traumatic injuries related to the events around what’s going on this time of year on campus,” said Dr. Tarek Razek, chief of the MUHC’s Division of Trauma Surgery and director of the Adult Trauma Program.

Razek explains most students don’t realize it’s not necessarily the alcohol itself that might be the problem, but rather the irrational behaviour due to heavy drinking.

“If you feel you’ve had too much to drink, you have,” he said.

“Your judgement gets impaired and you will do something you’ll regret for the rest of your life. It’s impressive to realize just how quickly your life can change with one bad judgement.”

He encourages students to have fun during Frosh, but reminds them to be cautious so they can keep having fun throughout the school year.

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24. 09. 2018
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Putting a creative spin on lunch as students head back to class – Edmonton

Putting a creative spin on lunch as students head back to class – Edmonton

Watch above: Bagged lunches no longer have to mean boring. But before you think you have to create some of those works of art parents are posting online, Su-Ling Goh has some tips on how to make a healthy lunch a bit more fun.

EDMONTON – From making sandwiches look like cartoon characters to creating a lunch around a particular theme, some parents will stop at nothing to make their children’s lunches more appealing.

Over the years, more and more parents have taken to social media to post pictures of the near works of art they’ve created of their kids’ lunches.

School lunch with a creative spin.

Credit: 杭州桑拿按摩论坛solent.photoshelter杭州夜网/

School lunch with a creative spin.

Credit: 杭州桑拿按摩论坛creative-food.blogspot桑拿按摩/

School lunch with a creative spin.

Credit: 杭州桑拿按摩论坛creative-food.blogspot桑拿按摩/

School lunch with a creative spin.

Credit: 杭州桑拿按摩论坛eatsamazing.co.uk/

School lunch with a creative spin.

Credit: 杭州桑拿按摩论坛eatsamazing.co.uk/

School lunch with a creative spin.

Credit: 杭州桑拿按摩论坛eatsamazing.co.uk/

School lunch with a creative spin.

Credit: 杭州桑拿按摩论坛eatsamazing.co.uk/

School lunch with a creative spin.

Credit: 杭州桑拿按摩论坛eatsamazing.co.uk/

School lunch with a creative spin.

Credit: 杭州桑拿按摩论坛eatsamazing.co.uk/

School lunch with a creative spin.

Credit: 杭州桑拿按摩论坛eatsamazing.co.uk/

School lunch with a creative spin.

Credit: 杭州桑拿按摩论坛杭州夜生活funkylunch杭州夜网

School lunch with a creative spin.

Credit: 杭州桑拿按摩论坛杭州夜生活lunchboxdad杭州夜网

School lunch with a creative spin.

Credit: 杭州桑拿按摩论坛杭州夜生活cutefoodforkids杭州夜网

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Related

  • Preschoolers’ eating habits linked to future heart health risks, Canadian study suggests

But while getting children to eat a healthy, balanced lunch can be difficult, an Edmonton-based registered dietitian suggests parents don’t necessarily need to go to this extreme to make a healthy lunch look appetizing.

“I think it’s great if you have the time and you want to go for it, go for it. But I know for me, it’s challenging to do that kind of stuff with cookie cutters, etcetera,” said Lalitha Taylor, a registered dietitian with the Edmonton Southside Primary Care Network.

“We do eat with our eyes, for sure, but you can make an aesthetically pleasing, nutritious lunch for your child by keeping it simple.”

While at times parents may feel as though they’ve simply run out of lunch ideas, Taylor believes the responsibility of making lunches doesn’t have to fall completely on the parents’ shoulders. She says getting kids involved in their own lunch preparation usually makes them more inclined to eat it.

“If you throw a lunch together and you expect your kid to eat it the next day and they have no idea what’s in their lunch, chances are you’re going to get some food items coming back to you.”

The Edmonton Southside Primary Care Network has put together a series of videos with numerous ideas for creative, healthy school lunches, including whole wheat pizza roll-ups, inside-out sandwiches and mini carrot pumpkin cupcakes.

And on days when getting creative seems like a bit too much work, Taylor says even the packaging can make for a better-looking lunch.

“There’s Bento Boxes that you can play around with, fun containers, fun Ziploc bags. So you don’t necessarily need to be spending a whole whack-load of your energy to be creating a beautiful looking lunch.”

READ MORE: 5 tips for packing healthy, kid-friendly back to school lunches

Above all, Taylor says it’s important to include at least three of the four food groups in a child’s lunch, and sneaking the fourth into a snack.

“We want to get some good healthy grains in there because of course that’s going to give children energy. We want to expose them to some more calcium and Vitamin D throughout the day… vegetables can also be fun and a crunchy part of that child’s lunch meal,” she said. “And then we want some good healthy protein choices in.”

And staying away from a lot of salt, fat and sugar will get kids started off on the right foot, Taylor adds.

“If we can get them started with healthy eating at the get-go, right now at this age, it’s going to set them up for success later on in the future and prevent chronic disease.”

Follow @CaleyRamsay

With files from Su-Ling Goh, Global News.

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24. 09. 2018
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Greyhound service cuts promise headaches for Brantford commuters – Toronto

Greyhound service cuts promise headaches for Brantford commuters – Toronto

MISSISSAUGA – Changes to bus service by Greyhound in Brantford is causing headaches for many commuters.

Brantford resident Martin Sigsworth takes a city of Brantford bus every morning to the Greyhound station in Brantford.  He boards the Greyhound at 6:30 am, then travels to  McMaster University, where he then boards a GO bus to Mimico station in Toronto.

The whole trip takes over 2 hours and 15 minutes.

“And then I do it again in reverse at night,” Sigsworth said.  “We wanted to be a one car family.”

Story continues below HangZhou Night Net

But last week Sigsworth`s regular bus driver told him there was changes coming to Greyhound service in the area. The official announcement was made Wednesday.  The changes will take effect September 2 – one week after a pamphlet was distributed at the Brantford Greyhound station by staff.

Greyhound will be cutting service from Brantford to Hamilton, Toronto to Hamilton and Toronto to Brantford.

Is your part of the province underserved by transit? Or has your commute been affected by cuts to transit? E-mail us at [email protected]杭州夜网 

Wayde Nei also takes the Greyhound Bus and says the late notice is part of the frustration.

“They cancelled the 6:30 a.m. and replaced it with a 4:45 am, which is extremely early,”  he said, adding he doesn’t start work until 8:30 a.m.

Greyhound spokesperson Linesha Gipson said in an email the reduction in service is “due to lower customer volume.”

“[The company has] seen a significant decline in customer volume within the last few years on these routes.  The low ridership numbers do not make the schedules feasible to maintain.”

But Nie, a frequent rider, said there are some rides during the day “when people have had to stand in the aisles, or be refused.”

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24. 09. 2018
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Sask. man argues he’s a heavy pot user, beats drug trafficking charge – Saskatoon

Sask. man argues he’s a heavy pot user, beats drug trafficking charge – Saskatoon

PRINCE ALBERT, Sask. – A Saskatchewan man has been found not guilty of drug trafficking by arguing that he is simply a very heavy pot smoker.

Devon Douglas Lavallee was charged in August 2013 when he was pulled over by the RCMP for erratic driving in the vicinity of Weldon, near Prince Albert.

Court heard that the officers found nearly half a kilogram of marijuana when they searched Lavallee’s vehicle and even more pot when they searched his home the next day.

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A Mountie with experience in drug trafficking cases testified that the dope was too much for a recreational user.

Const. Tyson Drabinasty said the “typical user” would not keep such large quantities on hand because marijuana loses its potency within six months to a year.

But Lavallee argued that he’s been smoking between five and 13 grams a day for 13 years. He said it was to help relieve chronic back pain.

Provincial court Judge Felicia Daunt said in her ruling released Monday that the Crown was unable to prove beyond a reasonable doubt that Lavallee intended to sell the pot.

Daunt said generally, she found Lavallee to be truthful, but prone to exaggeration.

“Although he didn’t bring any documentary evidence to back up his claim of chronic back pain, I have no reason to disbelieve him,” Daunt wrote.

“He says he smokes a lot of pot. This assertion is bolstered by all the indicia of personal use found in his truck, in his home and in his garage.

“He smokes so much that he forgot he had pot left when he went to buy some more.”

Daunt also noted that no scale or cellphone were found in Lavallee’s home – two items that can be evidence of trafficking.

“The absence of packaging material suitable for distribution in smaller quantities troubles me the most,” said Daunt.

“The Crown theory that the accused buys in half pound quantity and then turns around and sells in half pound quantity is pure speculation, and unsupported by any evidence that this is a business model anyone has encountered before.”

However, Lavallee was found guilty of possessing marijuana. The case is due back in court next March.

©2014The Canadian Press

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24. 09. 2018
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Ghost Town Mysteries: The cenotaph of Phoenix, B.C.

Ghost Town Mysteries: The cenotaph of Phoenix, B.C.

There’s a greater appreciation of ghost towns in the Kootenays than most places.

“For a place that’s relatively small, the amount of history generated is rather remarkable,” says Greg Nesteroff, a journalist with the Nelson Star who has researched many of Kootenay’s ghost towns.

“The history itself is so fascinating and diverse. It’s not just railway and foresty or mining, there’s all of those things.”

Story continues below HangZhou Night Net

In a boom-and-bust region where towns would quickly come and go, there are many ghost towns that dot the highways.

Most are lost to history – but one has an eight-foot-high monument in its honour.

Well, sort of.

The word cenopath is Greek for “empty tomb,” and you can find plenty of them throughout Canada. From coast-to-coast, there are monuments, many of which were erected in honour of those who died in World War I.

One of them is in Phoenix, B.C. Today, it’s best known as a ski hill sitting between Greenwood and and Grand Forks. A century ago, with a population of nearly 4,000, it had equal standing with them in terms of population.

PHOTO GALLERY: The town of Phoenix. All photos courtesy of BC Archives.

“It was a certainly a fledgling city,” says Nesteroff.

“It had a sense of permanence with all the amenities, you would find the major centres. The rise and fall of the town all played out over 20 years.”

Incorporated as a town in 1898, Phoenix had one of the most productive copper mines in B.C. for nearly two decades. It was of a company town, owned by Granby Consolidated Mining, which created lavish towns for its workers and their families.

There was a skating rink, a weekly newspaper, several stores – even a brass band.

Courtesy BC Archives.

In 1911, the Phoenix Hockey Club won the McBride Cup, given to B.C.’s top hockey team. They challenged the Ottawa Hockey Club for the Stanley Cup – but the team declined, saying it was too late in the year.

In the end, the fate of Phoenix was like so many other mining towns – when the price of copper crashed, the mine was shut down. However, when Granby announced the shutdown, the townsfolk were planning a cenotaph to honour 15 people from Phoenix who died in the First World War.

To make it a reality, the lumber and and iron were sold from the skating rink.

$1200 was raised, enough to build the cenotaph and donate $400 to the Legion in Grand Forks. By the time it was erected in 1920, the town buildings with any value were being shipped away.

“I’m trying to think if there’s another ghost town that has a cenotaph , and I can not think of it,” says Nesteroff.

The mine was reopened in the 1950s, operating as an open pit for nearly 20 years, before shutting down again. Today, Nesteroff says there are only a few people alive who ever lived in Phoenix. Only the mine pit, a decaying graveyard, and a few destroyed shacks remain.

Along with the cenotaph .

“It’s all the more poignant because it’s not just the men for the first world war, it’s a monument to the town of itself.”

“Ghost Town Mysteries” is a semi-regular online series exploring some of the strange sights from B.C.’s past.

The old trolley buses of Sandon
The swimming pool of Mount Sheer, B.C.
The stolen lightbulbs of Anyox, B.C.
The 30-year slumber of Kitsault, B.C.
Bradian, B.C., a ghost town for sale

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24. 09. 2018
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Moncton police dog who captured Canadians’ hearts gets back to work

Moncton police dog who captured Canadians’ hearts gets back to work

CALGARY- A police dog that captured the hearts of Canadians following the tragic deaths of three RCMP officers in Moncton is ready to get back to work.

Danny worked with Const. Dave Ross, who was killed along with two other Mounties during the terrifying shooting rampage. One of the most poignant moments during Ross’ funeral was the sight of Danny whimpering as he sat beside the coffin.

Story continues below HangZhou Night Net

Related

    RCMP release video of Danny the Dog doing well day after funeral

  • Justin Bourque pleads guilty to killing 3 Mounties in Moncton

  • Widows of fallen Moncton Mounties ‘grateful’ for fundraising support

READ MORE: Moncton police dog Danny to continue service after death of officer

The German Shepherd was sent to Innisfail, Alberta a short time later, where he has been retraining before heading back into the line of duty.

“We are really appreciative for the outpouring of support and interest from Canadians for Danny and his well-being. It’s been passionate and persistent since the events of June 4,” said Insp. Lemyre from RCMP Police Dog Services. “I want to thank all Canadians for the support and compassion they’ve shared since the passing of our fallen members, and for Danny and his future.”

WATCH: Danny, the police dog of fallen mountie Dave Ross says goodbye at his casket during memorial service on June 10

Danny had only been on the job for nine months before the shooting, and Ross’ wife said at the time that it wouldn’t be fair to Danny to retire him.

While RCMP dogs typically don’t change handlers during their career, it has happened in unique situations such as a handler retiring.

“I know there would have very likely been separation anxiety after the incident,” says Sgt. Eric Stebenne from RCMP. “I know the bond between Danny and the new handler has been very strong, and they are working well together.”

The service isn’t saying where Danny will be posted or who his new handler is.

“What’s important now is that Danny and his new handler be given the opportunity to perform their duties to the highest standard,” said Insp. Lemyre. “We want to give them both every opportunity to succeed and thrive in their new partnership.”

RCMP say Danny is very driven and confident, and they expect him to continue his career as a police service dog for at least five more years.

 

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24. 09. 2018
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Energy regulator relaxes restrictions on Plains Midstream

Energy regulator relaxes restrictions on Plains Midstream

CALGARY – The pipeline company behind two high-profile oil spills has improved its safety practices, but there’s still more work to be done, an audit by the Alberta Energy Regulator has found.

The watchdog said in a report this week that Plains Midstream Canada has not met, or just partially met, many of the requirements of a safety audit.

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Related

  • Plains Midstream pleads guilty, fined $1.3 million for two oil spills

  • Full-scale audit ordered against Plains Midstream Canada

  • Plains Midstream charged in 2012 oil pipeline leak into river

    Alberta regulator slams Plains Midstream over massive 2011 oil pipeline spill

However, it said: “As a result of improvements and initiatives undertaken by PMC over the last year, the AER’s overall conclusion is that PMC has and maintains many formal and informal processes in place to ensure that it can operate in compliance with applicable regulatory requirements on a long-term, sustainable basis.”

The AER noted Plains has hired experienced staff over the past few years and boosted management oversight.

The AER ordered the audit in July 2013, when it also imposed additional regulatory scrutiny on the company. That included a requirement that even the most routine or minor decisions be cleared by the regulator’s CEO, hampering its ability to obtain approvals for its operations in Alberta.

READ MORE: Full-scale audit ordered against Plains Midstream Canada 

AER spokesman Bob Curran says those enforcement actions have been lifted, but the company will continue to be watched closely and will have to report to the AER twice a year on progress being made.

In June, the company was fined $1.3 million after pleading guilty to environmental charges related to the two spills, one of which was the second-largest in Alberta history.

In April, 2011, the Rainbow pipeline spilled 4.5 million litres of oil in northern Alberta. In June, 2012, the Rangeland pipeline spilled nearly half a million litres in central Alberta.

©2014The Canadian Press

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24. 09. 2018
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With 77,000 new condos on tap, can Toronto handle the influx? – Toronto

With 77,000 new condos on tap, can Toronto handle the influx? – Toronto

Watch above: Why experts say city infrastructure needs to keep up with development. Sean Mallen reports. 

TORONTO – City councillors approved a staggering 755 storeys of new development in the city’s downtown core on Tuesday as part of an ongoing effort to increase density south of Bloor Street.

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That’s 6,887 new units, 377,900 square metres of non-residential space and 5.3 acres of new parkland.

And that’s on top of 70,000 residential units already approved and just waiting to be built.

But much as good planning demands density – and seductive as it can be for politicians to use construction cranes as campaign props – can Toronto’s infrastructure handle the influx of people, cars and buildings?

So far, yes. But if the city doesn’t move forward with infrastructure fixes and upgrades, it risks falling behind, leaving residents of those 77,000-odd new units high and dry.

“We have to make sure the people and the residents have the tools and the resources they need to be successful. And that’s one of our challenges,” downtown Councillor Kristyn Wong-Tam said in an interview Wednesday.

Councillor Joe Mihevc said the onslaught is part of huge changes the city will go through in the next generation.

 “If you want to do a financial analysis, it is about $21 billion of development, which is the equivalent of three or four Eglinton light rail lines from one end to the other. And that’s the largest infrastructure project in Canada these days.”

But, he said, the city has to make sure its infrastructure keeps up with the development.

The city’s planning department is studying whether Toronto is keeping up with development – analyzing everything from water capacity and sewage systems to schools, parks and daycares.

Chief City Planner Jennifer Keesmaat doesn’t think development needs to hit the brakes – yet.

But she admits the city is pockmarked with areas starving for adequate, up-to-date infrastructure – be it water capacity, parks or transit.

Commuters face congestion at the Bloor-interchange platform during rush hour on Monday, Feb. 4, 2013.

THE CANADIAN PRESS IMAGES/Christian Lapid

She noted that at least half of the new residents downtown walk or cycle to work, taking some strain off an already congested public transit system.

“So it actually really points to the importance of investing in cycling infrastructure, which is a fraction of the cost of transit infrastructure,” she said.

At the same time, Keesmaat said the relief line is absolutely critical for Toronto to stand a chance of moving people in and out of the city’s core.

“Given the magnitude of growth that we see, we simply cannot afford to pause on the downtown relief line,” Keesmaat said.

“We are creating a problem that is only going to mount and grow.”

The relief line – much touted by mayoral candidates but vague in its length, route, cost and time frame – could go down Don Mills, south on Pape Avenue, then west on King Street, giving people from the north and northeast a way to get to and from downtown rather than crowded buses, streetcars and subways.

The project though will cost billions: roughly $3.2 billion to connect Pape Station to St. Andrew Station, or nearly $8.4 billion to run the line from Don Mills and Eglinton to Pape Station, then St. Andrew and ultimately Dundas West station.

A 2012 Metrolinx report said some kind of transit fix – preferably a relief line – is “required before 2031” in order to deal with capacity concerns on the existing subway lines.

There is an upside to the 70,000 units and 750 storeys, though – a huge increase in tax revenue.

Mihevc explained the city’s coffers have been benefitting from the fast pace of development for several years but due to a number of factors from downloading services from the province, increased costs of policing and the demand for new services, the city hasn’t been able to invest in badly needed infrastructure.

“So it really hasn’t allowed us to do things like infrastructure planning like say around public transit, or strong additional park lands that we need,” he said.

With files from Sean Mallen

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